CALL FOR RESEARCH AND EVALUATION PARTNER — SENEGAL (CLOSED)

Jun 12, 2020

PRIF PDF PDF of Research and Evaluation Work on Child Trafficking Call for Proposals

OVERVIEW
BACKGROUND AND PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
AWARD INFORMATION
ELIGIBILITY
APPLICATION AND SUBMISSION INFORMATION
REVIEW PROCESS
AWARD ADMINISTRATION
FAQ AND CONTACTS
OTHER INFORMATION

OVERVIEW

Title: Call for Research and Evaluation Partner — Senegal

Date Issued: June 12, 2020

Full Proposal Deadline: August 15, 2020, 5:00 PM US Eastern Standard Time. Please submit full proposals to apries-team@uga.edu (strongly preferred) or mail to the address indicated below by this deadline. 

Nnenne Onyioha-Clayton, Program Manager
African Programming and Research Initiative to End Slavery
Sanford Hall
312 Herty Drive
Athens GA, 30602, USA

Synopsis of Program: The African Programming and Research Initiative to End Slavery (APRIES) is seeking a research and evaluation partner(s) in Senegal in order to establish baseline measures on trafficking in persons and evaluate implementing partners’ efforts to reduce child trafficking in Senegal. Applicants may apply for either the prevalence research component, process evaluation component, or both prevalence research and process evaluation components, and should clearly specify the component(s) for which they are applying. The prevalence research component includes a baseline and end line survey data. The baseline survey data will be preceded by in-depth interviews that identify service and policy gaps. 

A mid-term process monitoring evaluation will determine progress toward achieving project goals. A final project evaluation will determine project outcomes and immediate impact. There will be no process evaluation concurrent at the baseline for the prevalence research baseline. 

Amount: The estimated ceiling for the total award(s) is US $425,000 for the entire program period. The estimated cost for prevalence research baseline and endline is no more than $300,000. The estimated cost for the process evaluation, including midline and endline evaluations, is no more than $125,000. 

Eligibility: Organizations with no prior experience in Senegal and government agencies are not eligible to apply. Applicants will need to demonstrate their capability to carry out successful research in Senegal. French and English fluency are required.

If you have questions about the program prior to the deadline, please contact: 

Nnenne Onyioha-Clayton
Program Manager
apries-team@uga.edu 
+1 (706) 542-3364

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BACKGROUND AND FOCUS

The University of Georgia Research Foundation (UGARF) has funding from the Program to End Modern Slavery at the U.S. Department of State Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons (TIP Office) to estimate and reduce the prevalence of child trafficking in the West African countries of Sierra Leone, Guinea, and Senegal. The African Programming and Research Initiative to End Slavery (APRIES), a consortium of researchers from the University of Georgia (United States) and University of Liverpool (United Kingdom), manages the grant. APRIES uses a collective impact approach in all its work, including research, programming, monitoring, and evaluation. The goals of our project in Senegal are to:  

  1. Collect, analyze, and establish data on the prevalence of sex trafficking in identified hotspots within the Kédougou gold mining region of southern Senegal.
  2. Enhance the quality and scope of our implementing partners’ (IPs) anti-slavery operations resulting in 5-10% reduction in baseline reporting in target communities and 25% increase in number of victims served by sub-awardee implementing partners (IPs) from baseline by April 2024. 

In order to meet these goals of establishing baseline measures of trafficking and supporting implementing partners’ efforts to reduce trafficking, we are seeking a research and evaluation partner(s) in Senegal. Our work has focused on Sierra Leone and Guinea thus far, and has expanded into Senegal in 2020. Sex trafficking among women and girls has been identified in and around gold mining sites across Senegal’s Kédougou region. Victims’ countries of origin include Nigeria, Guinea, Mali, and Burkina Faso, with Nigerians reportedly constituting the majority proportion (US Department of State, 2019).

Applicants may apply for either the research component, evaluation component, or both research and evaluation components, and should clearly specify the component for which they are applying.

Baseline and Endline Prevalence Research 

The establishment of baseline measures using a shared measurement system is the first step in developing a common agenda with our implementing partners. Because current estimates of trafficking prevalence and sectors in Africa are based on data from few countries, service agencies lack adequate information about slavery prevalence that can inform programming. Baseline data for implementing partners will be collected through probabilistic research design, and using the most appropriate methods of studying hidden populations. Our approach incorporates qualitative data to establish service and policy gaps as well as surveys to establish human trafficking prevalence. The endline data is a replication of the baseline data and is supposed to show change over the baseline data.

Process Evaluation

Our monitoring and evaluation (M&E) process establishes agreement of program goals and objectives, a framework for output and outcome indicators, routine reporting and collection of related qualitative and quantitative data. The selected partner will work closely with APRIES’ monitoring, evaluation, research, and learning (MERL) coordinator and program managers, in-country program coordinator, and our implementing partners in ensuring progress toward objectives. Evaluation data will be used to assess implementing partners’ performance and to improve implementation activities. Key performance indicators and outcome indicators stated in implementing partners’ logic models will be used as benchmarks for monitoring the progress of implementing partners. Data from multiple sources will be used in evaluating progress, and a detailed rubric will be developed for rating each implementing partner. This rubric will include, but is not limited to, evaluation of needs of community/site/target population; physical resources; staff training; existing funding streams; and project curricula.

Current Timeline 

New application deadline: August 15, 2020, 5:00 PM US Eastern Standard Time (9:00 PM GMT).

Due to the COVID-19 outbreak, the precise start date of the program is to be determined.

July 30 2020 Deadline for questions 
July 30 2020 Deadline for notification of intent email
August 15 2020 Deadline for applications
Aug-Sep 2020 Partner(s) selected and grant awarded 
October 2020 Training of partner(s) on program requirements
November 2020  Training of enumerators and data collection begins for prevalence research
March 2021 Delivery of prevalence research and service gap reports
December 2021 Delivery of midline process evaluation methodology document
April 2022 Midline process evaluation data collection begins
June 2022 Delivery of midline process evaluation report and data.
November 2023 Delivery of endline process evaluation methodology document
May 2024 Final process evaluation and endline data collection begins
September 2024  Delivery of endline prevalence research and process evaluation reports and data
September 2024  End of grant

SCOPE OF WORK

Quantitative survey prevalence research baseline data is expected to be close to n=3,045 households. Qualitative data from prevalence research is expected from n=140 participants including survivors, service providers, policymakers, key informants, academics, and other relevant participants. The baseline prevalence research data report is expected to be at least 10,000 words, not counting the reference pages, introductory, and table of contents pages. Items for institutional review include but are not limited to: a) a detailed methodology description; b) research protocol documents; c) questionnaires and research instruments; d) consent forms; and e) outreach and communications documents to recruit study participants.

Baseline and Endline Research Deliverables

  • Conduct qualitative and quantitative interviews using a combination of (but not limited to) respondent driven sampling and the network scale up method on a specific trafficking population and/or sector that will be identified by the APRIES team. 
  • Submit the data, report, and analyses of findings of baseline data to APRIES six months from the start of data collection but no later than September 2021. APRIES will provide guidance on the relevant analyses that are required by the subgrantee in the MOU and as the research evolves.
  • In close collaboration with APRIES, complete a methodology document on the collection, protocol, and reporting of endline prevalence in Senegal by November 2023. This document is expected to be at least 20,000 words excluding all the introductory and reference pages. This document will also include the final process evaluation methodology to be completed by the process evaluation partner, if different from the research partner.
  • Complete endline data collection process to measure progress from baseline data, starting no later than May 2024.
  • Submit final reports and all data to APRIES by September 30, 2024. 

Process Evaluation Deliverables

  • In close collaboration and monitoring by APRIES, complete a methodology document on the collection, protocol, and reporting of midline process evaluation data by December 2021. This document is expected to be at least 7,500 words, excluding all introductory pages and reference pages.
  • Collect midline monitoring and process evaluation data for the programs selected by APRIES in Senegal, starting no later than April 2022. 
  • Submit midline monitoring and process evaluation reports to APRIES by June 2022. 
  • In close collaboration with APRIES, complete a methodology document on the final program evaluations of implementing partners in Senegal by November 2023. This document is expected to be at least 20,000 words excluding all the introductory and reference pages. This document will also include the final baseline data collection methodology to be completed by the research partner, if different from the evaluation partner.
  • Collect final process evaluation data for the programs selected by APRIES in Senegal, starting no later than May 2024.
  • Submit final reports and all monitoring and evaluation data to APRIES by September 30, 2024. 

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AWARD INFORMATION

Funding: The estimated ceiling for the total award(s) is US $425,000 for the entire program period. The estimated cost for prevalence research baseline and endline is no more than $300,000. The estimated cost for the process evaluation, including midline and endline evaluations, is no more than $125,000.

Estimated Number of Awards: Up to two sub-contracts will be awarded through this solicitation as a sub-grant to the larger research program. 

Program Period: Work will start by November 2020 and end by September 30, 2024 with a total program period of 3 years and 10 months.

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ELIGIBILITY

Eligible Organizations:

Organizations with no prior experience in Senegal and government agencies are not eligible to apply. Applicants will need to demonstrate their capability to carry out successful research in Senegal. French and English fluency are required.

Through this open, transparent, and competitive bid, and to enable us to meet our goals, we are seeking a research and evaluation partner(s) for the Senegal phase of our project. The selected partner(s) will be required to comply with all the articles that will be included in the memorandum of understanding (MOU). Organizations that have prior experience in human trafficking research in Senegal are especially encouraged to apply.

Successful applicants will demonstrate capacity to manage US government (USG) funding in an ethical and prudent way. Selected applicants will be expected to provide important documentation prior to receiving an award that includes: incorporation or registration certificate; list of board of directors or trustees; organizational chart; written accounting policies and procedures; standard procurement manual; written policy for travel expenses; and the last three years of audited financial statements. In addition to the proposed program narrative, application documents should include a logic model, a theory of change, a timeline, as well as a detailed budget and budget narrative. While not required, applicants are encouraged to include at least one letter of support from a local government agency and/or other NGO partner. See Application and Submission Information for the full list of documents to be submitted. Partners will be required to adhere to relevant USG foreign assistance terms and conditions.

Number of Proposals Per Organization:

One per lead organization. Organizations can submit additional applications as members of consortia.

Cost-Sharing: 

Cost-sharing is not required for this application.

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APPLICATION AND SUBMISSION INFORMATION

Preparation

The following components must be included in all applications. All application documents must be in English. Please use an easily readable font such as Calibri, Arial, or Times New Roman in no more than 12 pt. and no less than 10 pt. Proposals should be single-spaced and have 1-inch margins on all sides. Failure to meet these requirements may result in disqualification.

A. Signed Cover Page

Please include the following information, in the following order, on a single cover page: 

  1. Applicant Organization
    • Contact Address
    • Contact Phone Number
    • Contact Email Address
  2. Collaborating Organization(s) (if applicable)
    • Contact Address(es)
    • Contact Phone Number(s)
    • Contact Email Address(es)
  3. Program Title, which should be one of three options:
    • Research Only: “APRIES Research Partner: [Name(s) of Applicant Organization(s)]”
    • Evaluation Only: “APRIES Evaluation Partner: [Name(s) of Applicant Organization(s)]”
    • Research and Evaluation: “APRIES Research and Evaluation Partner: [Name(s) of Applicant Organization(s)]”
  4. Total Amount Proposed
    • Total Direct Costs
    • Total Indirect Costs
  5. Principal Investigator 
  6. Organizational DUNS/EIN Number (required for all applicants: see http://fedgov.dnb.com/webform/index.jsp
  7. Contracting Officer 
  8. Contracting Officer’s Signature

B. Proposal Summary 

In one single-spaced page, summarize your approach to the scope of work, previous relevant experience, management plan, and qualifications of your team.

C. Narrative

Please include the following components in a concise narrative of no more than 6 single-spaced pages. 

  • Approach to Scope of Work (up to 3 pages)

Provide an overview of your proposed approach to the scope of work for the research component, evaluation component, or both research and evaluation components, depending on application type. As part of this approach, please describe how your organization will practice social distancing and other best practices to minimize the transmission of the COVID-19 virus during data collection. Please provide a two-page logical framework to support your narrative. 

  • Previous Relevant Experience (suggested 1 page) 

Provide an overview of your previous relevant experience conducting research and/or evaluation projects. 

  • Management Plan (suggested 1 page)

Describe the plan for managing the scope of work. Be sure to clearly delineate each team member’s role and outline a clear organizational structure. An organizational chart is encouraged in this section. Explain how you will monitor progress toward your objectives.

  • Qualifications of Team (suggested 1 page)

Detail the program team’s capacity to successfully carry out the proposed scope of work (e.g. previous experience in the country/sector/population, previous experience using the approaches proposed). Highlight any previous work that demonstrates this capacity, and detail individual team members’ specific expertise and experience that will lead to the success of the proposed program. Highlight only the most relevant qualifications of individual members. CVs can be used to provide further details. 

D. Budget 

Each proposal must contain a proposed budget for the full project period. Please provide a breakdown or spreadsheet showing costs in each of the budget categories listed below, with detailed calculations showing estimation methods, quantities, unit costs, and other similar detail per program year. Any cost-share presented must be broken down according to line items.  (Note that proposed cost-share must adhere to U.S. government foreign assistance rules and regulations during program implementation).  Applicants may request funds under any of the categories below if the item and amount are considered necessary, reasonable, allocable, and allowable under 2 CFR § 200.

Budget amounts must be presented in United States dollars. Please use the currency converter here: https://www.oanda.com/currency/converter/.

Personnel -For each staff person, provide information such as job title, time commitment to the project as a percentage of full-time equivalent, annual salary (or wage rate), and salary from grant funds.

Fringe Benefits – Provide a breakdown of the amounts and percentages that comprise fringe benefit costs for employees, including health insurance, FICA, retirement insurance, and taxes. List fringe benefit costs separately from salary costs and explain how benefits are computed for each category of employee.

Travel – Identify staff and participant travel, including international airfare, in-country travel, domestic travel in the U.S., and per diem/maintenance (includes lodging, meals, and incidentals for both participant and staff travel). Rates of maximum allowance for U.S. and foreign travel are available at www.fedtravel.com. Per diem rates may not exceed the published USG allowance rates, but applicants may use lower per diem rates.

Equipment -For each type of equipment requested, describe the equipment, the cost per unit, the number of units, and the total cost. Equipment is defined as tangible property having a useful life of more than one year and an acquisition cost of $5,000 or more per item.

Supplies – List items separately using unit costs (and the percentage of each unit cost being charged to the grant) for items such as photocopying, postage, telephone/fax, printing, and office supplies. Applicants should include an itemized list of any personal protective equipment (PPEs) and supplies that they will need to practice hygiene and sanitation methods required to mitigate transmission of the COVID-19 virus during data collection.

Contractual – Provide the costs of all contracts for services and goods, except for those that belong under other categories (such as equipment, supplies, construction, etc.). For each sub-award or contract known at the time of application, provide a detailed line-item breakdown explaining specific costs and services.  If consultants will be used in the grant, provide all costs related to their activities, including travel and per diem costs.

Other Direct Costs – Provide computations for all other costs. These costs, where applicable and appropriate, may include but are not limited to insurance, food, professional services, space and equipment rentals, stipends, telephone and electricity.

Indirect Charges – Indirect charges are costs that have been incurred for common or joint objectives of an organization and cannot be readily identified with a particular cost objective. These costs are determined by the recipient’s accounting system’s definition. Generally, a negotiated indirect cost rate agreement (NICRA) is not warranted unless an organization has many U.S. government awards at one time.

Should an applicant not possess a NICRA, indirect expenses stated in the budget must be based on a de minimis rate of 10 percent of modified total direct costs. Modified total direct costs means all direct salaries and wages, applicable fringe benefits, materials and supplies, services, travel, and up to the first $25,000 of each subaward (regardless of the period of performance of the subawards under the award). Modified total direct costs excludes equipment, capital expenditures, charges for patient care, rental costs, tuition remission, scholarships and fellowships, participant support costs and the portion of each subaward in excess of $25,000. Other items may only be excluded when necessary to avoid a serious inequity in the distribution of indirect costs, and with the approval of the federal cognizant agency for indirect costs.

E. Budget Narrative

This section is a brief, two-to-three sentence explanation of each line item that justifies identified costs. 

Personnel – Identify staffing requirements by each position title with a brief description of duties, percentage of time dedicated to the project, work locations, and other justifications for these costs as they relate to the scope of work.

Fringe Benefits – Provide an explanation of fringe costs and how they are calculated.

Travel – Provide a description of travel costs, including the purpose of the travel, how the travel relates to the scope of work, and who will be traveling under these costs.

Equipment – Provide justification for any planned equipment purchase/rental for the scope of work.  Note that equipment is defined as tangible property having a useful life of more than one year and an acquisition cost of $5,000 or more.

Supplies – Describe general categories of supplies and their direct use for the scope of work. 

Contractual – Describe each contractual or consultant cost and outline the necessity of each for the scope of work.

Other Direct Costs – Provide a narrative description and a justification for each cost under this category and describe how the costs specifically relate to this scope of work.

Indirect Charges – Describe the cost rate used to calculate indirect charges.

F. CVs

CVs for each person who will serve as key personnel on the project should include educational attainment, employment history, any specialized training, and any publications. Each CV should be no more than two single-spaced pages in length. 

G. Facilities and Equipment

A description of the physical resources already available (e.g., does not need to be purchased) to the applicant for the proposed scope of work in no more than two single-spaced pages. Please include office space, vehicles, computers, and any software programs already available to the applicant. 

H. Letters of Support 

While not required, applicants are encouraged to include at least one letter of support from a local government agency and/or other NGO partner.

Submission Instructions

Please email fully completed applications to apries-team@uga.edu. 

While online applications are strongly encouraged, we will also accept applications by mail to the address below. Applicants who choose to mail their application are responsible for ensuring that the full package reaches the APRIES office by August 15, 2020. 

Mail to: 

Nnenne Onyioha-Clayton, Program Manager
African Programming and Research Initiative to End Slavery
Sanford Hall
312 Herty Drive
Athens GA, 30602, USA

All applications must be received by August 15, 2020, 5:00 PM US Eastern Standard Time.

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REVIEW PROCESS

The APRIES team will make a shortlist of finalists, which will be reviewed by the U.S. Department of State Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons (TIP Office). APRIES and the TIP Office will then make final decisions on applicants to be awarded.  

Review Criteria: 

  • Applications will be evaluated based on the following criteria: 
    1. Approach: The proposed project narrative demonstrates a clear, realistic, ethical approach to the scope of work that can be achieved in the time frame with appropriate risk assessment and high likelihood of meeting goal to decrease prevalence of sex trafficking in target regions and sectors. 
    2. Team: The applicant organization demonstrates highly relevant previous experience; a staffing plan, including special qualifications and language capacity; and strong capacity and management plans to successfully carry out the proposed scope of work. This includes the applicant’s established relationships with any prospective collaborators. Resources are available to ensure project feasibility.  
    3. Budget: The proposed budget is complete and includes all the costs of any personnel, supplies, and activities required by the scope of work. The cost items and amounts are deemed necessary and reasonable and the applicant’s needs are deemed feasible within the budget presented.

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AWARD ADMINISTRATION

Prior to receiving an award, selected applicants will be expected to provide important documentation including incorporation or registration certificate; list of board of directors or trustees; organizational chart; written accounting policies and procedures; standard procurement manual; written policy for travel expenses; and the last three years of audited financial statements.

Funds will be disbursed on a cost reimbursable basis and upon receipt of an invoice from Sub‐recipient not more often than monthly. Upon receipt of sufficient justification and approval from APRIES, advance payments may be made. Requests should be submitted to the key APRIES contact for this solicitation and include a justification for the advance, the amount of advance and the time period in which it is to be expended in writing. Approval of an advance will hinge on approval of APRIES’ Sponsor.  

Awardees will be required to submit quarterly, annual, and final reports over the course of the project period. Reports should provide both financial and narrative reporting on the scope of work to date. 

Based upon the results of the pre-award risk assessment, APRIES may consider imposing specific subaward conditions upon an awardee, as appropriate. These additional subaward conditions may include items such as the following:

  1. Requiring payments only as reimbursements and not allowing advance payments;
  2. Withholding authority to proceed to the next phase until receipt of evidence of acceptable performance within a given period of performance;
  3. (iii) Requiring additional, more detailed financial reports;
  4. (iv) Requiring additional program monitoring;
  5. Establishing additional prior approvals.

Awardees will be required to comply with the conditions imposed by UGARF’s award agreement issued by the U.S. Department of State including, but not limited to, the following:

  • Anti-Prostitution Policy and Requirements. The U.S. government is opposed to prostitution and related activities, which are inherently harmful and dehumanizing, and contribute to the phenomenon of trafficking in persons. Grantees are required to agree to the following special conditions prior to a grant being awarded: (1) None of the funds made available herein may be used to promote, support, or advocate the legalization or practice of prostitution. Nothing in the preceding sentence shall be construed to preclude assistance designed to combat trafficking in persons, including programs for prevention, protection of victims, and prosecution of traffickers and others who profit from trafficking in persons, by ameliorating the suffering of, or health risks to, victims while they are being trafficked or after they are out of the situation that resulted from such victims being trafficked.
  • Training Certification. An organization receiving funds must agree to the following: “This organization hereby certifies that, to the extent practicable, persons or entities providing legal services, social services, health services, or other assistance have completed, or will complete, training in connection with trafficking in persons.” TVPA sec.107A(b)(1) (P.L. 110-457).
  • STATE DEPARTMENT LEAHY AMENDMENT VETTING REQUIREMENTS: Funds provided under this award are subject to Section 620M of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, a provision titled “Limitation on Assistance to Security Forces” (the “Leahy Amendment”). Subsection (a) of that provision states: “(a) In General.—No assistance shall be furnished under this Act [the Foreign Assistance Act] or the Arms Export Control Act to any unit of the security forces of a foreign country if the Secretary of State has credible information that such unit has committed a gross violations of human rights.” Accordingly, none of the funds under this award may be used to provide training or other assistance to any unit or member of the security forces of a foreign country if the Department of State has credible information that such unit or individual has committed a gross violation of human rights. 

In signing this award, the Recipient agrees to exercise due diligence to ensure compliance with the Leahy Amendment provision and Department of State policy, and to cooperate with the Department of State in implementation of the requirement. 

The Department of State implements the Leahy Amendment requirement by vetting units or individuals proposed for training or other assistance to check for credible information of a gross violation of human rights by such units or individuals. 

To facilitate Department of State vetting, the Recipient must provide the following information for proposed participants at least sixty (60) calendar days prior to commencing award activities. This information should be submitted to the U.S. embassy in the country where the award will be implemented in order to initiate Leahy vetting procedures: 

Information needed: Full name, date of birth, country of birth, country of citizenship, gender, rank, title, and organizational affiliation. Please also include the activity and date that the activity will take place—if the person will participate throughout an extended program, please note the timeframe. Participant information should be submitted in the format attached.

Information required for “security forces” personnel: The above information is needed for each member of a foreign police or military unit (security forces, broadly defined) who will participate in any activity under this award. This includes both civilian and military employees of security forces participating in any activities funded under this award, including training, workshops or meetings, conferences, or other activities. 

The Recipient must collaborate with the relevant U.S. embassy on a case-by-case basis to determine if the Leahy requirement applies to specific activities or proposed participants. Individuals who are not members of the security forces but who participate in activities under the award (e.g., politicians, academics, etc.) generally do not need to be vetted. 

Submission Deadline: Each candidate must be cleared under Leahy vetting in advance of participation in activities funded under this award. The vetting process typically takes approximately one month, but may take longer if there are a large number of candidates or if issues arise. Thus, all information on proposed candidates must be received by the embassy at least sixty (60) days in advance of the training event or other activity. 

The Recipient agrees that it will not include any security forces candidate in training or other activities funded under this award until the State Department advises that the candidate has cleared Leahy vetting and is approved for participation.

Note on Pre-Award Risk Assessment

If the period of performance for the agreement is greater than one year, an additional risk assessment will be performed annually during the period of performance. 

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FAQ AND CONTACTS

Frequently Asked Questions 

Who should I contact if I have a question that is not covered by the information in this document?

For questions about the program, please write to Nnenne Onyioha-Clayton, Program Manager, at apries-team@uga.edu

Can organizations based in any country apply for this award?

Yes. Organizations that have a history of working in Senegal are eligible to apply. It is the responsibility of applicants to demonstrate their ability to work in Senegal.

How will the selection be made?

The selections will made in consultation between APRIES and the TIP Office.

What are the criteria for assessment of applications?

Applicants must adhere to the strict requirements of the application and show a clear approach, strong team, and comprehensive budget. 

Can an organization submit (or be involved in) more than one application?

Organizations can submit one proposal per lead organization or serve as a sub-recipient under a prime applicant in another proposal.

Can governments or government agencies apply?

No. Government agencies cannot apply for this opportunity.

What definitional approach to addressing human trafficking should applicants use in their project design?

The U.S. government defines “trafficking in persons” as: 

  • Sex Trafficking – when a trafficker uses force, fraud, or coercion to compel a person to engage in a commercial sex act or when a trafficker causes a child who has not attained 18 years of age to engage in a commercial sex act. 
  • Forced Labor – when a trafficker recruits, harbors, transports, provides, or obtains a person for labor or services by using force, fraud, or coercion. 

Trafficking in persons does not require the movement of a person. Under the Trafficking Victims Protection Act (TVPA) and generally consistent with the UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons (Palermo Protocol), individuals may be trafficking victims regardless of whether they once consented, they participated in unlawful acts their traffickers compelled them to commit, someone transported them into the exploitative situation, or they were simply born into a state of servitude.  Under this solicitation, UGA will not support projects that use alternate definitions of trafficking.

Full Contact Information:

Nnenne Onyioha-Clayton, Program Manager
African Programming and Research initiative to End Slavery
Sanford Hall
312 Herty Drive
Athens, GA 30602
United States
apries-team@uga.edu
+1 (706) 542-3364

Email is the strongly preferred mode of contact for this program.

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OTHER INFORMATION

Important Definitions

All APRIES partners are expected to be familiar with the following important definitions:

Child: person under the age of 18 (Trade and Development Act of 2000; ILO C. 182; UN Convention on the Rights of the Child).

Child Domestic Worker: “children who work in third-party private households under an employment arrangement. Child domestic workers engage in various tasks that include cleaning, cooking, gardening, collecting water, and caring for the children and the elderly.  Child domestic workers sometimes have live-in arrangements, whereby they live in their employer’s household and work in exchange for room, board, and sometimes education.” (ILAB, 2017 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor, p. 93). 

Children’s Hazardous Unpaid Household Services:“the domestic and personal services a child performs within the child’s own household, under the following conditions: (a) for long hours; (b) in an unhealthy environment, including equipment or heavy loads; or (c) in dangerous locations.” (ILAB, 2017 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor, p. 96).

Children’s Hazardous Work: “‘work which, by its very nature or circumstances in which it is carried out, is likely to harm the health, safety or morals of children”… “is colloquially referred to as ‘hazardous work.’” (ILAB, 2017 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor, p. 94, drawn from Article 3(d) of ILO C. 182). 

Child Labor Trafficking: the recruitment, transportation, transfer, harbouring or receipt of a child for the purpose of labor exploitation.

Child Sex Trafficking:  the recruitment, harboring, transportation, provision, obtaining, patronizing, or soliciting of a person under the age of 18  Such an act shall be considered child sex trafficking even if this does not involve any of the means set forth in subparagraph (a) of this article [means set forth in Article 1, subparagraph (a) of the Palermo Protocol: “the threat or use of force or other forms of coercion, of abduction, of fraud, of deception, of the abuse of power or of a position of vulnerability or of the giving or receiving of payments or benefits to achieve the consent of a person having control over another person, for the purpose of exploitation.” Thus, consent of an individual under 18 years of age is not relevant in proving sex trafficking. Commercial sex is anything of value that is given to or received by any person for sex. 

Child Trafficking: the recruitment, transportation, transfer, harbouring or receipt of a child for the purpose of exploitation shall be considered ‘trafficking in persons’ even if this does not involve any of the means set forth in subparagraph (a) of this article [means set forth in Article 1, subparagraph (a) of the Palermo Protocol: “the threat or use of force or other forms of coercion, of abduction, of fraud, of deception, of the abuse of power or of a position of vulnerability or of the giving or receiving of payments or benefits to achieve the consent of a person having control over another person, for the purpose of exploitation.”].  Thus, the recruitment, transportation, transfer, harbouring, or receipt of a person under the age of 18 for any form of exploitative labor or commercial sex act is considered child trafficking, in addition patronizing and soliciting in the case of sex trafficking.