Prevalence Reduction Innovation Forum (PRIF)

CALL FOR PROPOSALS:
RESEARCH INNOVATION IN ESTIMATING THE PREVALENCE OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING

PRIF PDF PDF of PRIF Call for Proposals

Overview

Award Information

Eligibility

Application and Submission Information

Review Process

Award Administration

FAQ and Contacts

Appendices

OVERVIEW

Title: Calls for Research Innovation in Estimating the Prevalence of Human Trafficking

Date Issued: January 15, 2020

Full Proposal Deadline: March 4, 2020, 5:00 PM US Eastern Standard Time. Please submit full proposals to apries-web@uga.edu (strongly preferred) or mail to the address indicated below by this deadline. 

Dr. Lydia Aletraris, Project Coordinator
African Programming and Research Initiative to End Slavery
School of Social Work
279 Williams Street,
Athens GA, 30602, USA

Synopsis of Program: The goal of this project is to build a global community of researcher-learners in the science of human trafficking prevalence estimation. The project has two main aims:

1) To document the robustness of various methodological approaches in human trafficking prevalence research;

2) To identify and build the capacity of human trafficking teams in the design, testing, and dissemination of human trafficking prevalence data.

To achieve these aims, we are seeking strong research teams to apply at least two methods of estimating human trafficking prevalence in a selected hot spot and sector outside the US. Prior to data collection, successful applicants will participate in an initial conference and training in Washington, D.C. on the methods of estimating human trafficking prevalence. Applications from research teams who have strong in-country collaborations and who have experience in using existing and promising methods are encouraged to apply for this unique opportunity.

Award Amount: $200,000-$450,000. Only in exceptional circumstances might a higher budget be considered for funding.

Eligibility: Nonprofit organizations in or outside of the United States, including universities, other research organizations, NGOs, INGOs are eligible to apply. Government agencies and private entities are not eligible to apply. 

If you have questions about the program prior to the deadline, please contact: 

Dr. Lydia Aletraris, Project Coordinator
Prevalence Reduction Innovation Forum 
African Programming and Research Initiative to End Slavery
apries-web@uga.edu 

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BACKGROUND AND PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

I. Background and Aims
The University of Georgia has been awarded funding from the US Department of State Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons (J/TIP) to implement an innovation conference and issue sub-awards for research on the prevalence of human trafficking. The African Programming and Research Initiative to End Slavery (APRIES), a consortium of researchers from the University of Georgia (USA) and University of Liverpool (United Kingdom), is managing the grant. More reliable and accurate estimates will inform more effective programs and policies aimed at survivors and victims and lessons learned can be applied to the study of other hidden populations. Given that the various methods of estimating human trafficking prevalence are fraught with unmeasurable errors, we plan to extend the science of human trafficking prevalence measurement through the robust testing of various methodological approaches in varying contexts. This effort is a collaboration among the US J/TIP Office, APRIES, and the Hard-to-Reach Population Methods Research Group (HPMRG) in the US. APRIES uses a collective impact approach in all its work – including research, programming, monitoring, and evaluation, that involves commitments and mutually reinforcing activities by a group of important actors from different sectors to help address human trafficking. Strong collaboration with local academics and researchers is a hallmark of APRIES approach; we extend this expectation to researchers who propose to work in other countries in which they are not native.

The goal of this project is to build a global community of researcher-learners in the science of human trafficking prevalence estimation. The project has two main aims: 

Aim 1: To document the robustness of various methodological approaches in human trafficking prevalence research. 

Aim 2: To identify and build the capacity of human trafficking teams in the design, testing, and dissemination of human trafficking prevalence data. 

To achieve these aims, we are seeking strong research teams to apply at least two methods of estimating human trafficking prevalence in a selected hot spot and/or sector in one of the regions listed below. With strong justification, other countries and regions may be proposed, but preference will be given to applicants that work within one of the following countries:

  • Western Hemisphere:  
    – Costa Rica
    Note: Applicants are encouraged to focus on forced labor in the fishing industry

    – Colombia
    Note: Applicants are encouraged to focus on forced labor

    – Brazil
    Note: Applicants are encouraged to focus on sex trafficking

  • Africa: 
    – Tanzania
    Note: Applicants are encouraged to focus on domestic servitude

    – Madagascar
    Note: Applicants are encouraged to focus on child sex trafficking or child domestic servitude

  • South and Central Asia: 
    – Pakistan
    Note: Applicants are encouraged to focus on forced labor in brick kilns

  • East Asia and the Pacific: 
    – Indonesia 
    Note: Applicants are encouraged to focus on a specific province or community within Indonesia

  • Near Eastern Affairs: 
    – Tunisia
    Note: Applicants are encouraged to focus on domestic servitude

    – Morocco
    Note: Applicants are encouraged to focus on internal trafficking

Organizations may submit multiple applications. However, an organization may be the lead organization on only one application per region. Applications from research teams who have strong local collaborations and who have experience in using existing and promising methods on any hidden population are encouraged to apply for this unique opportunity. Applicants are encouraged to place their findings within the local context. 

II. Research Innovation Activities 

The research innovation awards will be used for activities that achieve the two aims as described above. Each team must test at least two methods of estimating human trafficking prevalence in a selected hot spot and sector in one of the eight regions listed above. Priority will be given to teams with strong methodologists, data analysts, and in-country history and collaborations. We encourage the use of methodologies aimed at hard-to-reach populations. Note: Prior to data collection, successful applicants will participate in an initial conference in Washington, D.C. on the methods of estimating human trafficking prevalence outside the United States. 

The high impact activities include: 

  1. Innovation Conference 1 – Successful applicants will send two members each for a kickoff conference/workshop in Washington, D.C. where harmonization of research studies will be the priority. 
    Target dates for conference: Late Spring 2020
  2. Field Testing of Research Methods & Data Analysis – successful applicants will complete baseline estimates on human trafficking prevalence data in selected hot spots and sectors. This phase, including data collection, analyses, and report writing will last about 18 months. Throughout this period, APRIES and HPMRG will be available to provide technical support to the research teams. Research teams will produce two reports that include prevalence findings and a report that documents the team’s research process. 

    Each team must propose to use at least two quantitative methods of establishing prevalence and triangulate their findings. For example, applicants could include estimates such as multiple systems estimation, respondent-driven sampling, and/or the network scale-up method in a population where trafficking is believed to be prevalent. Estimates could also include both respondent-driven sampling and implementation of network scale-up methods in a known population. Applicants are welcome to propose new hybrid methodologies or propose any other innovative method not listed here. All proposed studies must include a primary data collection component. 

    Successful research teams will complete the studies in selected trafficking hotspots within the proposed countries. It is not necessary to establish national prevalence estimates. The research should focus on a particular geographical region, as the aim is to compare the results of each methodological approach.
    Target final report dates: December 2021

  3. Innovation Conference 2: At a final event hosted in a location to be determined, each of the funded teams will present the results of their research and share lessons learned and recommendations for moving forward. 
    Target dates for conference: Late Spring 2022
  4. Dissemination of Findings in an Academic Journal:  APRIES will identify a high impact research methodology journal where research findings will be disseminated through the respective journal’s peer-review system. The findings will also be compiled in a book. 
    Target dates: December 2022

III. Full Timeline

  • March 4, 2020 Deadline for submission of applications
  • April 2020 Awardees notified
  • Late Spring 2020 Conference on Research Innovation in Washington D.C.
  • December 2021 Final reports from the field due to APRIES
  • Late Spring 2022 Final Innovation Conference
  • December 2022 Journal publications, book, and other reports

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AWARD INFORMATION

Funding: Individual awards will range from US $200,000-$450,000 total, including indirect costs, for the entire project period of 18 months. Applicants should use their organization’s off-campus NICRA rate for indirect costs. If their organization does not have an official NICRA, applicants should use a rate of 10%. 

Project Period: Projects must start before June 2020 and end before December 31, 2021 with a total project period of 18 months.

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ELIGIBILITY

Eligible Organizations:

Nonprofit organizations in or outside of the United States, including universities, other research organizations, NGOs, INGOs are eligible to apply. Government agencies and private entities are not eligible to apply. 

Through this open and competitive process we are seeking strong research teams to complete community-based and rigorous research outside the US. Teams with no experience in human trafficking research but that have experience in researching other hard-to-reach populations outside the US are encouraged to apply and will be considered. Universities, research think-tanks, NGOs, and INGOs with experience in anti-trafficking research and who can demonstrate capacity to manage US government (USG) funding in an ethical and prudent way are eligible to apply. Successful applicants will abide by the highest ethical standards in doing research and acquire the necessary IRB approval. 

Number of Proposals Per Organization:

Organizations may only submit one application in which they are the lead applicant per region. Organizations may participate in more than one application per region as collaborators, but may only serve as the lead applicant on one application per region. 

Cost-Sharing: 

Cost-sharing is not required for this application. However, applicants are allowed to propose use of their existing resources to supplement the award. Cost-share must follow the USG Code of Federal Regulations and applicants must delineate between USG and non-USG funding.

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APPLICATION AND SUBMISSION INFORMATION

Preparation

The following components must be included in all applications. All application documents must be in English. Please use Calibri, Arial, or Times New Roman in no more than 12 pt and no less than 10 pt. Proposals should be single-spaced and have 1-inch margins on all sides. Failure to meet these requirements may result in disqualification.

a. Signed Cover Page

Please include the following information, in the following order, on a single cover page: 

  1. Applicant Organization
    1. Contact Address
    2. Contact Phone Number
    3. Contact Email Address
  2. Collaborating Organization(s) (if applicable)
    1. Contact Address(es)
    2. Contact Phone Number(s)
    3. Contact Email Address(es)
  3. Project Title
  4. Selected Region
  5. Total Amount Requested
    1. Total Direct Costs
    2. Total Indirect Costs
  6. Project Dates
  7. Principal Investigator 
  8. Organizational DUNS/EIN Number (required for all applicants: see http://fedgov.dnb.com/webform/index.jsp
  9. Contracting Officer (must be different from Principal Investigator)
  10. Contracting Officer’s Signature

b. Proposal Summary [20 points)

In one single-spaced page, summarize the problem statement, project goals, approach, research questions, and expected outcomes.

c. Proposal Narrative  [40 points]

Please include the following components in a proposal narrative of no more than fifteen single-spaced pages

  1. Introduction (suggested 1.5 pages)
    Provide a succinct introduction to the project. Give an overview of the project region, goals, approach, and team. 
  2. Statement of Problem and Literature Review (suggested 2 pages)
    Summarize the trafficking problem to be addressed in the selected countries. Provide a succinct review of the literature as it pertains to 1) the selected countries, and 2) the proposed research approach. 
  3. Project Goals and Objectives (suggested 1 page) 
    Succinctly state the project goals and objectives, including clear research questions. 
  4. Research Approach (suggested 7 pages)Provide a detailed account of your proposed research approach. Ensure that the following information is discussed in this section:
    • Selected country or countries, including any hot spots
    • Selected trafficking sector (e.g. mining industry) 
    • Selected population (e.g. children)
    • Two or more specific research methods to be used and tested (i.e., techniques for measuring prevalence in hard-to-reach populations—e.g., respondent-driven sampling, network scale-up method). Demonstrate rigor and technical feasibility of the sampling approach, including any preliminary sample size calculations, and how the design will minimize sampling and other known bias. If innovative or technology-based data collection methods are being proposed, describe how they have been successfully applied in related areas of research and the suitability of application to the proposed study. 
    • Participant recruitment strategies (i.e., how and where the populations(s) of interest will be accessed). To what extent is your study generalizable?
    • Strategy for collaborating with in-country researchers. If you have existing in-country relationships, clarify how you will further strengthen these relationships and how your research will not be extractive. As stated in the introduction, we expect robust local collaborations with local researchers and academics.
    • Consideration of risk and ethics of proposed research plan
    • How is your research likely to inform other fields of research with hard-to-reach-populations?
  5. Management Plan (suggested 2 pages)
    Describe the research team’s plan for managing the research project. Be sure to clearly delineate each team member’s role and outline a clear organizational structure. An organizational chart is encouraged in this section. 
  6. Qualifications of Research Team (suggested 1.5 pages) 
    Detail the research team’s capacity to successfully carry out the proposed research (e.g., previous experience in the region/sector/population; previous experience using the methods proposed). Highlight any previous work that demonstrates this capacity, and detail individual team members’ specific expertise and experience that will lead to the success of the proposed research project. Highlight only the most relevant qualifications of individual members; biographical sketches can be used to provide further details. 

d. Timeline  [10 points]
Provide a timeline of the proposed research activities.

e. Budget  [10 points]
Each proposal must contain a budget for the full project period. Provide a breakdown or spreadsheet showing costs in each of the budget categories listed below, with detailed calculations showing estimation methods, quantities, unit costs, and other similar detail per program year. Applicants may request funds under any of the categories below if the item and amount are considered necessary, reasonable, allocable, and allowable under 2 CFR § 200.

Budget amounts must be presented in United States dollars. Please use the currency converter here: https://www.oanda.com/currency/converter/.

There is no need to budget for the conferences in 2020 and 2022. Those travel expenses will be covered directly by the University of Georgia Research Foundation. 

Personnel -For each staff person, provide information such as job title, time commitment to the program as a percentage of full-time equivalent, annual salary (or wage rate), and salary from grant funds.

Fringe Benefits – Provide a breakdown of the amounts and percentages that comprise fringe benefit costs for employees, including health insurance, FICA, retirement insurance, and taxes.  List fringe benefit costs separately from salary costs and explain how benefits are computed for each category of employee.

Travel – Identify staff and participant travel, including international airfare, in-country travel, domestic travel, and per diem/maintenance (includes lodging, meals, and incidentals for both participant and staff travel). Rates of maximum allowance for U.S. and foreign travel are available at www.fedtravel.com. Per diem rates may not exceed the published USG allowance rates, but applicants may use lower per diem rates.

Equipment – For each type of equipment requested, describe the equipment, the cost per unit, the number of units, and the total cost. Equipment is defined as tangible property having a useful life of more than one year and an acquisition cost of $5,000 or more per item.

Supplies – List items separately using unit costs (and the percentage of each unit cost being charged to the grant) for items such as photocopying, postage, telephone/fax, printing, office supplies, visas, and vaccines.

Contractual – Provide the costs of all contracts for services and goods, except for those that belong under other categories (such as equipment, supplies, etc.). For each sub-award or contract known at the time of application, provide a detailed line-item breakdown explaining specific costs and services.  If consultants will be used in the grant, provide all costs related to their activities, including travel and per diem costs.

Other Direct Costs – (These will vary depending on the nature of the grant.) Provide computations for all other costs. These costs, where applicable and appropriate, may include but are not limited to insurance, food, professional services, space and equipment rentals, stipends, telephone and electricity.

Indirect Charges – Indirect charges are costs that have been incurred for common or joint objectives of an organization and cannot be readily identified with a particular cost objective. These costs are determined by the recipient’s accounting system’s definition. Generally, a negotiated indirect cost rate agreement (NICRA) is not warranted unless an organization has many U.S. government awards at one time. Indirect costs for this project must be off-campus rates. Organizations that do not have an official NICRA should use a 10% rate for indirect charges.

f. Budget Narrative  [5 points]
This section is a brief, two-to-three sentence explanation of each line item that justifies identified costs. 

Personnel – Identify staffing requirements by each position title with a brief description of duties, percentage of time dedicated to the program(s), work locations and other justifications for these costs as they relate to the program.

Fringe Benefits – Provide an explanation of fringe costs and how they are calculated.

Travel – Provide a description of travel costs, including the purpose of the travel, how the travel relates to the program, and who will be traveling under these costs.

Equipment – Provide justification for any planned equipment purchase/rental for the program.  Note that equipment is defined as tangible property having a useful life of more than one year and an acquisition cost of $5,000 or more.

Supplies – Describe general categories of supplies and their direct use for the project.

Contractual – Describe each contractual or consultant cost and outline the necessity of each for the project.

Other Direct Costs – Provide a narrative description and a justification for each cost under this category and describe how the costs specifically relate to this project.

Indirect Charges – Describe the cost rate used to calculate indirect charges.

g. Biographical Sketches  [10 points]
Biographical sketches for each person who will serve as senior personnel on the project should include educational attainment, employment history, and a relevant list of publications Biographical sketches should be no more than five single-spaced pages in length.

h. Facilities and Equipment  [5 points]

A description of the physical resources available to the applicant for the proposed project in no more than two single-spaced pages. Please include office space, computers, software programs, and any scientific instrumentation relevant and available to the proposed project. 

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Submission Instructions

Please email fully completed applications to apries-web@uga.edu

While online applications are strongly encouraged, we will also accept applications by mail to the address below. Applicants who choose to mail their application are responsible for ensuring that the full package reaches the APRIES office by March 4, 2020. 

Mail to: 

Dr. Lydia Aletraris, Project Coordinator
African Programming and Research Initiative to End Slavery
School of Social Work
279 Williams Street,
Athens GA, 30602, USA

All applications must be received by March 4, 2020, 5:00 PM US Eastern Standard Time.

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REVIEW PROCESS

The APRIES team will select a list of finalists, which will be reviewed by the US Department of State Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons (J/TIP). APRIES and J/TIP will then make final decisions on applicants to be awarded.  

Review Criteria 
Applications will be evaluated based on the following criteria: 

Work Plan: The proposed research narrative demonstrates a detailed description of the target population, and a clear, appropriate, ethical methodology with appropriate risk assessment and strong likelihood of success. 

Team: The research team and applicant organization demonstrates relevant experience with, and knowledge of the research topic and/or methodology; a staffing plan, including special research qualifications, and language capacity; and strong capacity and management plan to successfully carry out the proposed research. This includes the applicant’s established relationships with local partners. Resources are available to ensure project feasibility.  

Budget: The proposed budget is complete and includes all the costs of any personnel, supplies, and activities required by the projects. The cost items and amounts are deemed necessary and reasonable and the projects needs are deemed feasible within the budget presented.

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AWARD ADMINISTRATION

Funds will be disbursed on a cost reimbursable basis and upon receipt of an invoice from sub‐recipient not more often than monthly. Upon receipt of sufficient justification and approval from APRIES, advance payments may be made. Requests should be submitted in writing to the key APRIES contact for this solicitation and include a justification for the advance, the amount of advance and the time period in which it is to be expended. Approval of an advance will hinge on approval of APRIES’ Sponsor.  

Awardees will be required to submit 5 quarterly reports and 1 final report over the course of the project period. Reports should provide both financial and narrative reporting on the project to date. 

Based upon the results of the pre-award risk assessment, APRIES may consider imposing specific subaward conditions upon a subrecipient, as appropriate. These additional subaward conditions may include items such as the following:

  1. Requiring payments only as reimbursements and not allow advance payments;
  2. Withholding authority to proceed to the next phase until receipt of evidence of acceptable performance within a given period of performance;
  3. (iii) Requiring additional, more detailed financial reports;
  4. (iv) Requiring additional project monitoring;
  5. Establishing additional prior approvals.

Note on Pre-Award Risk Assessment

If the period of performance for the agreement is greater than one year an additional risk assessment will be performed annually during the period of performance. 

Monitoring Awardees

The African and Programming Initiative to End Slavery (APRIES) will conduct the following monitoring activities during the grant period with awardees: 

  1. Review financial reports as required under the subaward agreement; 
  2. Review performance reports as determined by the project’s logic model, with goal(s), objectives, activities, indicators, outputs, target and actual outcomes, and impact; 
  3. Verify that an on-site review is being performed pursuant to the Uniform Guidance; and
  4. Follow up to ensure that the awardee takes appropriate action on any deficiencies. 

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FAQ and CONTACTS

Frequently Asked Questions 

Who should I contact if I have a question that is not covered by the information in this document?

For questions about the project, please write to apries-web@uga.edu with the subject: Research Innovation in Estimating the Prevalence of Human Trafficking

Can organizations based in any country apply for this award?

Yes. However, the research cannot be done in the United States.

How will the selection be made?

The selections will made in consultation between APRIES and the J/TIP office.

What are the criteria for assessment of applications?

Applicants must adhere to the strict requirements of the application and show a clear strategy to conduct sound research and analyses.

Can an organization submit (or be involved in) more than one application?

Yes. Organizations may submit only one application on which they are the lead organization. Organizations may serve on multiple applications per region as collaborators, as long as they are only the lead organization on no more than one application.

Can the proposal be an expansion of an existing project or program?

No. Data will be collected in selected hot spots using the most advanced methodological approaches. We are not expecting national-level data, only regional-level data that focus on a particular population and/or sector of trafficking. We encourage applicants to conduct research where no known data currently exists.

Can governments or government agencies apply?

No. Government agencies cannot apply for this opportunity.

Full Contact Information:

Dr. Lydia Aletraris, Project Coordinator
African Programming and Research Initiative to End Slavery
School of Social Work
279 Williams Street
Athens, GA 30602
United States
apries-web@uga.edu 
(706) 542-3739

Email is the strongly preferred mode of contact for this program.

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APPENDICES

Please use the following attachment in submitting supplemental material.

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Accepting Applications

APRIES seeks implementing partners for our work on child trafficking in Guinea and Sierra Leone.
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